Courses 2016

Course list will be expanded…

 

Free Expression, Humor and Terror

Prof. Dr. James E. Lennertz (Lafayette College, PA)

Among the complex issues raised by the horrific Charlie Hebdo events in Paris in January, 2015 is the question of whether free expression that some find offensive, indeed blasphemous , justifies strong reaction, legal or extra-legal, peaceful or violent. The course will introduce concepts of free expression and its limits, comparing especially absolutist U. S. with qualified European models.

A particularly interesting focus of this general problem is offensive, humorous free expression: “Calm down, it was just a joke for ‘God’s’ sake!” Three specific questions will frame the comedic dimension of the analysis: what is the nature and the role of humor, is there a comedic ethics and does humor legally mitigate or aggravate offensive expression?

The course will consider the nature, history, and cultural diversity of violent societal conflict. In particular, the course will consider evolving definitions of “war” and attempts by international organizations to create a binding framework – legal or at least ethical – for constraining war. Finally, this section of the course will focus upon wars OF as well as wars ON “terror” and the western and Islamic just war traditions.

The recent particular events and issues will thus be set in the larger context of contemporary debates about terrorism, religious fundamentalism, law and ethics, globalization and the pre-requisites of civil, democratic society.

Date: 11.01.2016 – 19.01.2016

Number of ECTS credits: 5

Preliminary Syllabus

Registration deadline: October 31

 

Human Trafficking – An International Perspective

Prof. Dr. Alexis Aronowitz (University College Utrecht)

This course will examine the definition of human trafficking and study a number of legal instruments (conventions and laws) in order to come to a full understanding of how human trafficking is defined. Discussion will focus on what we actually know about human trafficking – how we measure the problem, and why it is so difficult to determine just how many persons are being trafficked and whether a person is a victim of trafficking. The course will explore the different perspectives from which we can examine trafficking – as a criminal justice and organised crime problem, but also from the perspective of supply and demand, human rights, immigration, poverty and gender inequality.

Date: 11.01.2016 – 19.01.2016

Number of ECTS credits: 5

Preliminary Syllabus

Registration deadline: October 31

 

Debating World Literature

Prof. Dr. Henrik Birus (Jacobs University)

The course offers an introduction to the concept of world literature as a key term of Comparative Literature as well as Cultural Studies. During the 19th and 20th century it was almost exclusively a ‘European affair’, but since the turn of the century there is a fruitful discussion of this concept especially in the United States.

The course deals with the most important exponents of the current debate and its preconditions and results. In a next step it questions the connection of the rise of world literature with the socio-economical as well as ideological advance of globalization. Finally it casts light on the historical roots of this concept which was coined by the late Johann Wolfgang Goethe and propagated by his liberal contemporaries in France as well as e.g. by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels.

Instruction focuses on the theoretical potential of this concept by discussing actual theoretical texts as well as those from its founding period. The aim of the course is to give students an understanding of the usefulness of theoretical debates in the humanities and of their applicability to actual problems in Literary and Cultural Studies.

Date: 21.01.2016 – 29.01.2016

Number of ECTS credits: 5

Preliminary Syllabus

Registration deadline: Octpber 31

 

Intercultural Competence

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Kühnen (Jacobs University), Annette Gisevius (InterCultur)

Our living and working environment is affected by globalisation and internationalisation. Hence, the ability to communicate effectively and to deal with others in intercultural settings has become a necessity. The widely shared understanding of intercultural competence divides the concept into three main categories: knowledge, skills, and attitudes, all of which will be examined in this course.
To achieve this, the course comprises two pillars: 1) a mainly theoretical part will assess the impact of culture on the human mind, and 2) a more practically oriented part will look at the foundations and applications of intercultural training. In order to bridge the gap between theory and practice, this course will be offered in collaboration with practitioners from InterCultur gGmbH, each of whom has long-term training experience. After you have successfully completed this seven-day course, you will have learned how culture affects human behaviour and will be familiar with the concepts of intercultural training. You also have the opportunity to be certified as an “Intercultural Trainer” if you attend three extra workshop days (additional costs).

Date: 18.01.2016 – 29.01.2016

Number of ECTS credits: 5

Registration deadline: November 30, 2015

Please visit the website for further information: Intercultural Competence