Courses 2017

Intercultural Competence

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Kühnen

Our living and working environment is affected by globalisation and internationalisation. Hence, the ability to communicate effectively and to deal with others in intercultural settings has become a necessity. The widely shared understanding of intercultural competence divides the concept into three main categories: knowledge, skills, and attitudes, all of which will be examined in this course.
To achieve this, the course comprises two pillars: 1) a mainly theoretical part will assess the impact of culture on the human mind, and 2) a more practically oriented part will look at the foundations and applications of intercultural training. In order to bridge the gap between theory and practice, this course will be offered in collaboration with practitioners from InterCultur gGmbH, each of whom has long-term training experience. After you have successfully completed this seven-day course, you will have learned how culture affects human behaviour and will be familiar with the concepts of intercultural training. You also have the opportunity to be certified as an “Intercultural Trainer” if you attend three extra workshop days (additional costs).

Date: tba

Registration deadline: November 4th

Number of ECTS credits: 5

 

Literatur

Hendrik Birus

[Information to be updated.]

Date: tba

Registration deadline: November 4th

Number of ECTS credits: 2.5

 

Human Trafficking

Prof. Alexis Aronowitz (University College Utrecht, Netherlands)

This course will examine the definition of human trafficking and study a number of legal instruments (conventions and laws) in order to come to a full understanding of how human trafficking is defined. Discussion will focus on what we actually know about human trafficking – how we measure the problem, and why it is so difficult to determine just how many persons are being trafficked and whether a person is a victim of trafficking. The course will explore the different perspectives from which we can examine trafficking – as a criminal justice and organised crime problem, but also from the perspective of supply and demand, human rights, immigration, poverty and gender inequality.

Date: tba

Registration deadline: November 4th

Number of ECTS credits: 2.5

 

War and Culture

Brendan Dooley (University College Cork)

War is and has been a central feature of human civilization, shaping peoples, states and cultures. However, war is more than a method of expansion and defence. It is a form of life and expression with deep roots in the various interactions characteristic of the manifold cultures within the human community. This module explores the ways in which war and warfare have been apprehended, within the scheme of human values, back and forth in time, and in different contexts, from Machiavelli to Clausewitz, from Titian to Picasso, from Ariosto to Paul De Man, with a view to understanding the underpinnings of war and the experience of war in an intercultural framework. Themes will include the culture of warfare, the cult of warfare, warfare as ceremonial, art and warfare, literature and warfare, warfare and communication.

Date: January 9th – 13th

Registration deadline: November 4th

Number of ECTS credits: 2.5

 

Free Expression, Humor and Terror

Jim Lennertz (former professor at Lafayette College)

Among the complex issues raised by the horrific Charlie Hebdo events in Paris in January, 2015 is the question of whether free expression that some find offensive, indeed blasphemous , justifies strong reaction, legal or extra-legal, peaceful or violent. The course will introduce concepts of free expression and its limits, comparing especially absolutist U. S. with qualified European models.

A particularly interesting focus of this general problem is offensive, humorous free expression: “Calm down, it was just a joke for ‘God’s’ sake!” Three specific questions will frame the comedic dimension of the analysis: what is the nature and the role of humor, is there a comedic ethics and does humor legally mitigate or aggravate offensive expression?

The course will consider the nature, history, and cultural diversity of violent societal conflict. In particular, the course will consider evolving definitions of “war” and attempts by international organizations to create a binding framework – legal or at least ethical – for constraining war. Finally, this section of the course will focus upon wars OF as well as wars ON “terror” and the western and Islamic just war traditions.

The recent particular events and issues will thus be set in the larger context of contemporary debates about terrorism, religious fundamentalism, law and ethics, globalization and the pre-requisites of civil, democratic society.

Date: tba

Registration deadline: November 4th

Number of ECTS credits: 2.5

 

Radical Perspective in Literature: Anarchy

Giselda Beaudoin (Rollins College); Christian Beck (University of Central Florida)

How do you understand the Law? What is your relationship to it? Many of you undoubtedly “obey the law”, but why? Is the law also how we understand morality? What if by obeying the law you find yourself being immoral? In this course, we will approach the Law with a healthy dose of suspicion and question its authority/legitimacy. When much of the population hears the term “anarchy”, they think of chaos (an attempt of Marx to malign anarchist thought) or people dressed in black breaking windows. In fact, the popular image of the “A” inside a circle (or rather an “O”: Ⓐ) is from a quote from Pierre-Joseph Proudhon: “Anarchy is the mother of Order”. Anarchy and Anarchisms (there are a variety of them) believe, simply put, that a centralized state government is not necessary for the control of a people. Many anarchists believe the State, oppressive hierarchies, or any centralized form of governance is a consolidation of power that uses that power to sustain itself on the backs of those that do not possess power—i.e., oppression. In this vein, the course will seek to identify the variety of powers, oppressions, hierarchies, and general forms of restrictive power that are utilized to control, manipulate, interpolate, and cajole individuals into a desired behavior. For our literary analysis, we will be utilizing a form of anarchism referred to “Postanarchism”. This does not mean, “the thing that comes after anarchy”, but rather the merging of poststructuralist thought with anarchist thought. After investigating some aspects of anarchism, we will venture into postanarchism, and then use our new knowledge to analyze possible anarchist trends within literature, as well as, identify the function and legitimacy of the Law.

Date: tba

Registration deadline: November 4th

Number of ECTS credits: 2.5

 

Hormones & Behavior or Introduction to behavioral neuroendocrinology

Dr. Kelli A. Duncan, Vassar College

This course will provide an introductory overview of behavioral endocrinology beginning with hormone production and actions on target tissues and continuing with an exploration of a variety of behaviors and the hormonal regulation/consequences. We will use a comparative approach to examine the reciprocal interactions between the neuroendocrine system and behavior, considering the effects of hormones on development and adult behavior in addition to how behavior regulates endocrine physiology. While much of the course will focus on non-human vertebrate species, the relevance to humans will be explored where appropriate. Topics include: sexual differentiation and sex differences in behavior, reproductive, parental, and aggressive behaviors, and hormonal and behavioral homeostatic regulation.

Date: January 23rd – 26th

Registration deadline: November 4th

Number of ECTS credits: 2.5